Kingman

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Kingman

Kingman

We spent last night in Kingman and are staying here tonight.  Kingman is near Nevada, California and the Grand Canyon, so they have LOTS of hotels and motels.

We’re staying at the Ramblin’ Rose on Route 66.  This former Travel Lodge is typical of the 40’s through 60’s motels in the west.  A long strip of rooms with an office at the end.

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Our Hotel Last Night and Tonight

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Ramblin’ Rose

The place is very clean (no odors – one of my pet peeves).  The issue a metal key on a hotel key tag.  That’s something you don’t see any more and a bit nostalgic.

Church

Paul and I went to church here in Kingman.  Several people came up and introduced themselves.  We told them about our trip along Route 66.  It is a nice friendly ward here and only about 1/2 mile from Route 66.

Laundry Day

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Paul Loading His Wash

Normally I wouldn’t do laundry on a Sunday.  There is a laundromat just up the road from the Ramblin’ Rose Motel.  It cost $1.50 for the wash, and 25 cents for 6 minutes on the dryer.  It only took an hour to get all our laundry washed and dried

 

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A Window to Cleaner Clothes

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Paul Waiting It Out

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Free Rides Only 25 cents for 6 Minuties

Great Lunch

Lunch was great today.  We searched Google and found a diner not far from the Ramblin’ Rose.  We headed there.

Mr. D’z

We found it to be a beautiful retro diner on the outside and inside.  We met the owner, Armando, and he provided us with a wonderful waitress (Kendal) and meal.  Paul had the BLT, and I had the Andy Devine Burger.

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The Andy Devine Burger and Sweet Potato Fries at Mr. D’z

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Paul’s Sandwich Being Served by Kendal

I was all set to drink water until I asked the waitress what type of root beer they served.  She said it was their own homemade root beer.  That sold me.  It was GOOD.  VERY GOOD.  In fact, it was GREAT.

After our meal, the entire staff came out for a group photo.

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The Staff at Mr. D’z

 

Other Shots from Nearby

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Another Train Along Route 66

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A Retro Pump in a Retro Car Dealership that Sells Old Cars

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Old Car Restoration Place

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Leather Shop for Motorcyclists

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Manequins… Again

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Custom Jackets

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Cool Vespa 250

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Bel Air Behind Mr. D’z

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Matching Office

 

 


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Delgadillo

Delgadillo

Whenever I think of Route 66, I think of Seligman, Arizona, and then I think of the Delgadillo Family and the Snow Cap Drive-In.   There’s a lot to Route 66, but the Snow Cap Drive-In is at the heart of things.

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Roadside Attraction

The Snow Cap Drive-In is a collection of funny things.  For example, the bathrooms are fully plumbed outhouses with eclectic stuff mounted on the walls inside.  Even if you do not need to go to the bathroom, you owe it to yourself to peek inside.  Oh, and take your camera.

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Inside the Outhouse

Leaving Williams

Williams was a zoo.  Of all the places we’ve stayed on Route 66 this was the most crowded.  The diner where we ate was filled to capacity, and several motels and hotels had their “No Vacancy” lights on.

I wasn’t impressed with our motel, and even less with the free breakfast.  So, we skipped the “free breakfast” (Cheerios or Fruitloops), and went to Safeway and bought hot breakfast sandwiches.

Because Williams is a gateway city to the Grand Canyon, expect to pay outrageous prices for lodging and food.  About the only deal going is a discount souvenir shop on west-bound Route 66.

The loop of Route 66 that goes through Seligman and ends at Kingman is a fun drive.  It takes you through the mountains, through several little towns and follows the railroad tracks.

Trains

Speaking of railroad tracks, check out this idiot.  With signs warning about the dangers and the fact it is trespassing, he goes on the other side of the chain to get a picture.  Had a train come down that track, he would have been killed.

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Stupid is as Stupid Does – STAY AWAY FROM TRAIN TRACKS

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No Excuses – The Rails are Marked No Trespassing

On the other hand, we stopped to take pictures of the mountains, and as soon as we did, here comes a train (it was quite a distance from us.)  It was fortuitous that it came just as we stopped to take pictures.

People

People are half the fun of Route 66.  We’ve met some amazing people.  Today we met a couple who ride one of those motorcycle trikes, a girl from Australia, a family from Israel and some young adults from Spain.  We talked to a local girl working in one of the shops.   In addition, we met a guy who actually knows where Rochester is because he went to RIT back in the 70s!!!

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Attended R.I.T. in the 70s

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Local Girl

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Family From Israel

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Laura from Australia

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Laura from Australia

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Mountain Bike Riding Across Arizona

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Friends from Spain

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Friends from Spain – Posing by the Old Pumps

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Denise and John – a local couple

The majority of the people we meet are happy and cheerful.  But, that’s not always the case.  I walked in to one shop and said, “You’re open!  Every time I’ve stopped in the past your store is closed.”

She grumbled, “We’re open 7 days a week.”

Here are some more shots from today…

 

 

 


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Decommissioning

Decommissioning

Route 66 is a decommissioned U.S. Highway.  Decommissioning a highway means it will no longer receive Federal funds for its maintenance.  This is exactly what happened to Route 66 piece by piece.

It was known as the Will Rogers Highway.  Kingman, Arizona, (a city on Route 66) was home to actor Andy Devine.  This was a very popular stretch of highway.

When they decommissioned it, some sections became “business loops” along Interstates.  Some were abandoned and left to decay.  Others were adopted by local states and counties.  For example, one section is California became State Route (SR) 66.  All of this makes it literally impossible to drive Route 66 from Chicago to L.A. as one contiguous section of road.

It is common to find abandoned equipment, buildings and automobiles along Route 66.  It is the Ghost Town of roads.

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Abandoned Truck

Used To Be

It is what used to be.  Along Route 66 are abandoned buildings too.   You can’t tell what some are, while others may be obvious.  Because of this,  be respectful and do not remove anything.  If you do, there will be nothing left for others to enjoy.

As we drive Route 66 we hope to identify what those buildings were.  If we find old pictures of before they were abandoned, we’ll see if we can use them.

Ukulele